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    Crime Scene Photo Instructor:       Becky Thompson

    Contact info:   thompsonbe@georgetownisd.org 

    GHS  Rm 152   943-5100, ext. 7158

                           

                                                                                                                                

    Text: Barbara Deslich and John Funkhouser, Forensic Science for High School.    

              2nd Edition.  Kendall Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, Iowa 52004           

              ISBN: 978-0-7575-4414-9

     

    Course Description: 

    Forensic Science

    PEIMS Number: 13029500* (FORENSCI)

    Grade Placement: 11-12

    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry.

    Recommended prerequisites: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security and Law Enforcement I.

     

    Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science.

     

     

     

    "Wherever he steps, whatever he touches, whatever he leaves, even unconsciously, will serve as a silent witness against him. Not only his fingerprints or his footprints, but his hair, the fibers from his clothes, the glass he breaks, the tool mark he leaves, the paint he scratches, the blood or semen he deposits or collects. All of these and more bear mute witness against him. This is evidence that does not forget. It is not confused by the excitement of the moment. It is not absent because human witnesses are. It is factual evidence. Physical evidence cannot be wrong, it cannot perjure itself; it cannot be wholly absent. Only human failure to find it, study and understand it can diminish its value."

    -         Paul L. Kirk (1902-1970),  forensic scientist

     

     

    Chapter - TEKS

    Topics and Skills Included

    Chap 1 & 2

     

    Introduction To Forensic Science and the Law, Types of Evidence

     

    TEXT 3F, 4A-F

     

    • Scope and history of forensics
    • Services offered by crime labs
    • Basic types of law and the criminal justice system
    • Careers options within the forensic sciences
    • Indirect vs. direct evidence
    • Individual evidence vs. class evidence
    • Identification of physical evidence

     

    Chap 3 & 4

     

    The Crime Scene, Fingerprints

     

    TEKS  5A–J, 6A, 8A-G

     

    • Making and recording observations (including sketches with measurements and digital photographs)
    • Making inferences and citing evidence to support them
    • Methods of obtaining and storing evidence
    • Chain of custody
    • Recognizing, classifying and comparing fingerprint patterns
    • Automatic Fingerprint Identification System
    • Tell the differences among latent, plastic, and visible prints
    • Develop latent prints both physically and chemically

     

    Chap 5 & 6

     

    Hair and Fibers

     

    TEKS 6H, 7B, 7C

    • Describe the structure of a hair
    • Tell the difference between human and animal hair
    • Tell which characteristics of hair are important for forensic analysis
    • Distinguish and identify different type of fibers
    • Understand polymerization
    • Carry out an experiment in thin-layer chromatography
    • Judge the probative value of hair and fiber evidence

    Chap 7 & 8

     

    Drugs and Toxicology

     

    TEKS  6B-D, 6H, 10A-D, 13A-B

     

    • Chemically identify illicit drug types and their effects on the body
    • Classify types of illicit drugs
    • Test for drugs and poisons using chemical tests, chromatography, & spectrophotometry
    • Explain the absorption, distribution and elimination of alcohol through the body
    • Discuss the connection of blood alcohol levels to the law,
      incapacity, and test results.

     

     

     

     

    Chap 9 & 10

     

    Trace Evidence, Soil and Glass Analysis

     

    TEKS 6B, 6E-J

     

    • Physical properties of matter
    • Properties of light
    • Density
    • Refractive Index
    • Forensic analysis of glass, including ballistics
    • Relate soil type to the environment
    • Understand the concept of spectrophotometry and its applications
    • Analyzing experimental results and drawing conclusions

     

    Chap 11 & 12

     

    Blood and DNA Analysis

     

    TEKS  9A, 11A-D, 12A-D

     

    • Determine whether a stain is blood
    • Determine whether a bloodstain is human or animal blood
    • ABO blood types & their inheritance
    • Testing for blood using gel diffusion, Kastle-Meyer, & luminal
    • Explore bloodstain patterns as a function of velocity, direction,
      and height of fall
    • Testing for other bodily fluids
    • Review structure and function of DNA
    • Isolate and extract DNA from cells
    • Describe the function and purpose of a restriction enzyme
    • How to apply the concepts of RFLP, PCR, and STRs to
      characterize DNA
    • Calculate probabilities of identity using DNA analysis

     

    Chap 13 & 14

     

    Forensic Entomology and Human Remains

     

    TEKS  15A-F, 16A-D

     

    • The stages of death
    • How insects can be used to estimate postmortem interval
    • Distinguish among major insect types associated with carrion
    • Identify the relationship between insect type and the stages of death
    • Perform the same experiments that forensic entomologists do
    • Explore variables affecting the determination of time of death
    • Identify major bones of the human body
    • Distinguish between human and animal remains
    • Distinguish between a male and a female skeleton
    • Give an age range after examining unknown remains
    • Describe differences in skull features among the three major racial categories
    • Explain the role of dental matching in forensic science
    • Estimate height by measuring long bones
    • The wound describe death, rigor mortis and cold death

     

    Chap 15 & 16

     

    Firearms, Tool marks, Impressions, Documents and Handwriting Analysis

     

    TEXAS 14A-D

     

    • Distinguish types of firearms
    • Measure individual features of bullets and cartridge cases
    • Describe how a handgun works
    • Use color tests to find gunshot residue
    • Describe the procedure for estimating the
      distance between muzzle blast and target
    • Make casts of different types of impressions
    • Explore  how expert analysts can individualize handwriting to a particular person
    • Three types of forgery
    • How to characterize different types of paper
    • The types and impact of computer crime
    • Characterize your own handwriting using 12 points of analysis
    • Detect deliberately disguised handwriting
    • Detect erasures and develop impression writing

     

     

    FORENSIC SCIENCE

    Text: Barbara Deslich and John Funkhouser, Forensic Science for High School.    

              2nd Edition.  Kendall Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, Iowa 52004

              ISBN: 978-0-7575-4414-9

    I.   Course Description: 

    Forensic Science

    PEIMS Number: 13029500* (FORENSCI)

    Grade Placement: 11-12

    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry.

    Recommended prerequisites: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security and Law Enforcement I.

    Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science.

     

     

    Course Outline

    Chapter - TEKS

    Topics and Skills Included

     

    Chap 1 & 2

     

    Introduction To Forensic Science and the Law, Types of Evidence

     

    TEXT 3F, 4A-F

     

    • Scope and history of forensics
    • Services offered by crime labs
    • Basic types of law and the criminal justice system
    • Careers options within the forensic sciences
    • Indirect vs. direct evidence
    • Individual evidence vs. class evidence
    • Identification of physical evidence

     

     

    Chap 3 & 4

     

    The Crime Scene, Fingerprints

     

    TEKS  5A–J, 6A, 8A-G

     

    • Making and recording observations (including sketches with measurements and digital photographs)
    • Making inferences and citing evidence to support them
    • Methods of obtaining and storing evidence
    • Chain of custody
    • Recognizing, classifying and comparing fingerprint patterns
    • Automatic Fingerprint Identification System
    • Tell the differences among latent, plastic, and visible prints
    • Develop latent prints both physically and chemically

     

     

    Chap 5 & 6

     

    Hair and Fibers

     

    TEKS 6H, 7B, 7C

    • Describe the structure of a hair
    • Tell the difference between human and animal hair
    • Tell which characteristics of hair are important for forensic analysis
    • Distinguish and identify different type of fibers
    • Understand polymerization
    • Carry out an experiment in thin-layer chromatography
    • Judge the probative value of hair and fiber evidence

     

    Chap 7 & 8

     

    Drugs and Toxicology

     

    TEKS  6B-D, 6H, 10A-D, 13A-B

     

    • Chemically identify illicit drug types and their effects on the body
    • Classify types of illicit drugs
    • Test for drugs and poisons using chemical tests, chromatography, & spectrophotometry
    • Explain the absorption, distribution and elimination of alcohol through the body
    • Discuss the connection of blood alcohol levels to the law,
      incapacity, and test results.

     

     

     

     

     

    Chap 9 & 10

     

    Trace Evidence, Soil and Glass Analysis

     

    TEKS 6B, 6E-J

     

    • Physical properties of matter
    • Properties of light
    • Density
    • Refractive Index
    • Forensic analysis of glass, including ballistics
    • Relate soil type to the environment
    • Understand the concept of spectrophotometry and its applications
    • Analyzing experimental results and drawing conclusions

     

     

    Chap 11 & 12

     

    Blood and DNA Analysis

     

    TEKS  9A, 11A-D, 12A-D

     

    • Determine whether a stain is blood
    • Determine whether a bloodstain is human or animal blood
    • ABO blood types & their inheritance
    • Testing for blood using gel diffusion, Kastle-Meyer, & luminal
    • Explore bloodstain patterns as a function of velocity, direction,
      and height of fall
    • Testing for other bodily fluids
    • Review structure and function of DNA
    • Isolate and extract DNA from cells
    • Describe the function and purpose of a restriction enzyme
    • How to apply the concepts of RFLP, PCR, and STRs to
      characterize DNA
    • Calculate probabilities of identity using DNA analysis

     

     

    Chap 13 & 14

     

    Forensic Entomology and Human Remains

     

    TEKS  15A-F, 16A-D

     

    • The stages of death
    • How insects can be used to estimate postmortem interval
    • Distinguish among major insect types associated with carrion
    • Identify the relationship between insect type and the stages of death
    • Perform the same experiments that forensic entomologists do
    • Explore variables affecting the determination of time of death
    • Identify major bones of the human body
    • Distinguish between human and animal remains
    • Distinguish between a male and a female skeleton
    • Give an age range after examining unknown remains
    • Describe differences in skull features among the three major racial categories
    • Explain the role of dental matching in forensic science
    • Estimate height by measuring long bones
    • The wound describe death, rigor mortis and cold death

     

     

    Chap 15 & 16

     

    Firearms, Tool marks, Impressions, Documents and Handwriting Analysis

     

    TEXAS 14A-D

     

    • Distinguish types of firearms
    • Measure individual features of bullets and cartridge cases
    • Describe how a handgun works
    • Use color tests to find gunshot residue
    • Describe the procedure for estimating the
      distance between muzzle blast and target
    • Make casts of different types of impressions
    • Explore  how expert analysts can individualize handwriting to a particular person
    • Three types of forgery
    • How to characterize different types of paper
    • The types and impact of computer crime
    • Characterize your own handwriting using 12 points of analysis
    • Detect deliberately disguised handwriting
    • Detect erasures and develop impression writing